What if “Agile” is nothing more than the dynamic of a system?

credits www.cognitve-edge.com
  • Complicated: all people are linked
  • Simple: only a top-down link exist
  • Chaos: none of them are linked.
  • Complicated: all participants are interacting together to analyse something to collect “good practices” or to validate an outcome.
  • Simple: The information shared from the “top” is evident for all participants in the system and doesn’t need to be discussed. Ex. Fire alarm = get out.
  • Chaos: nobody is interacting, and all the people are working in their area.
credits Dave Snowden, Cognitive Edge
  1. During a couple of minutes, each attendee has to think individually what and how the purpose resonates. That´s my Chaos.
  2. After that time-box, you ask the crowd to work together to solve that learning problem. That interaction is also time-boxed and takes the majority of the time. (Complex)
  3. Once the time is over, we all debrief together, and some points are clarified, adjusted, improved (Good practice). Here comes “Complicated”.
  4. As the teacher, then I validate the “Good Practice” with “Best practice”, and the result might be evident for all attendees. Back to Simple.
credits Pierre Neis
  • then during the sprint planning phase, each of the team members tries to show up what is this all about. (Chaos)
  • then the team, collectively try to design what and how the solution might be (Complex)
  • the team discuss and negotiate with the Product Owner and try to make a deal on what has the highest business value and lowest complexity, or what needs to be fixed now (Complicated).
  • then the improved sprint goal is agreed (Simple), and the team starts their sprint (Chaos) until next days daily scrum where the teams align and works together until the end of the sprint (Complex).
  • the sprint ends in a Review (Complicated), and a Retrospective (Complicated) and a potentially shippable increment is marked “done”, and the working model improved according to good practice (deviation from the initial working model) for Simple.
  • then the loop is starting again.
credits Pierre Neis
credits Pierre Neis
  • then during the sprint planning (Chaos) → self-commitment
  • then the team, collectively try to design what and how the solution might be (Complex) → cohesion of the agents (stakeholders) ensures complex behaviour
  • the team discuss and negotiate with the Product Owner and try to make a deal (not imposing) on what has the highest business value and lowest complexity, or what needs to be fixed now (Complicated)→ alignment.
  • then the improved sprint goal is agreed (Simple), and the team starts their sprint (Chaos) until next days daily scrum where to team aligns and works together until the end of the sprint (Complex)→ alignment + cohesion
  • the sprint ends in a Review (Complicated), and a Retrospective (Complicated) and a potentially shippable increment is marked “done”, and the working model has improved according to good practice (deviation from the initial working model) for Simple→ separation
  • then the loop is starting again.
credits Pierre Neis
  • avoid collision: scrum-of-scrums, impediment bashing, daily stand up
  • planning skills: planning poker, magic estimation, customer journeys, …
  • follow the line: scrum ceremonies and rules

How does scrum looks alike when applying Agile Systems Dynamics then?

You take the basic rules defined in the scrum guide and improve it with these nine principles:

Scrum X, core principle
Scrum X, set the stage
Scrum X, everything is not an option
Scrum X, Decide
Scrum X, no never ending stories
Scrum X, human relations
Scrum X, balance is everything
Scrum X, what do you realy want?
Scrum X, set the pace
Scrum X, from mechanic to dynamic

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Pierre Neis

Pierre Neis

On my business card, I wrote Agile Coach. My Agile coaching is an evolution of systemic coaching putting myself in the system and not as an outstanding observer